Millennial Values Do Not Change With Age: What Cause Durability Means For Cultural Nonprofits (DATA)

2 Responses to Millennial Values Do Not Change With Age: What Cause Durability Means For Cultural Nonprofits (DATA)

  1. James Fowles

    Hi Colleen. I formerly worked at a museum, but now work at a youth-serving non-profit. I simply want to let you know that your posts consistently feel like they’re written for my organization, though it is not in the arts and culture branch of the non-profit world. They’re always compelling and challenging, and I usually find myself forwarding them to my team leader, in additional to my social media networks.

    Thank you for the continued insight. And keep up the great work!

     
  2. Michael Dowling

    Great analysis. The other interesting thing to note is that each generation as it moves into adolescence and adulthood is faced with macro-forces that influence and indelibly impress upon them ideals and views of the world. Unlike Baby Boomers and the Gen-Xers before them, Millenials emerged from the womb with a higher sense of “purpose.” Not to oversimplify too much, but Baby Boomers strove to capitalize on the seeds sown by the struggles of their forebears and provide a better life for their offspring; Gen Xers looked to exploit the opportunities and build personal wealth – coming of age in a time of relative peace and prosperity. Millenials, for the most part, have not ever been about “money” and don’t see it as the end goal that defines their lives. They trade in an entirely different currency – which is measured by the impact they can make in the world. Because they pursue that ideal everyday – instead of working to build wealth to leave behind – their sense of identity only grows stronger. Thanks for starting an important dialogue!

     

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