Personalizing the Onsite Experience Increases Satisfaction in Visitor-Serving Organizations (DATA)

volunteer harvard museums Data suggest that personal interactions between staff and visitors significantly increase overall satisfaction, improve value perceptions, and contribute to a more meaningful overall experience. Here’s how.  As many of my regular readers already know, I’m captivated by the relationship between “physical touch” (old fashion, face-to-face communication) and “digital touch” (digital communication) in visitor-serving organizations – and how these forces work together to make these organizations more relevant and financially stable.  The data regarding how these forces work together is rather compelling…and I’ve even spoken about it before. Digital touch increases reputation and aids in driving attendance – but physical touch provides the “there-there” in a way that technology has yet to supplant. We monitor both reputation and visitor satisfaction for numerous visitor-serving enterprise at IMPACTS, and we’ve found one type of “physical touch” to be extremely potent in increasing visitor satisfaction: When attendees have a personal facilitated experience (or, as we affectionately call them, a PFE) remarkable things reliably occur.

What is a personal facilitated experience?

A PFE is a one-to-one or one-to few interaction that occurs between an onsite representative of the organization and a visitor. This representative could be a docent, volunteer, or any other organization-associated individual who has a direct interaction with an individual visitor, family or couple. A traditional museum cart experience provides a PFE. A volunteer showing you your seat at the theater provides a PFE. An entryway greeter provides a PFE. So does a stationed volunteer, a wayfinder, or even a particularly attentive clerk at a museum store. Shows, talks, or tours – while certainly providing value to one’s overall experience – do not constitute a PFE, as the market considers PFEs powerful due to the personalized attention and one-on-one nature of the interaction. While we’ve found that these other types of encounters provide an efficient density of interaction, they do not always provide the kind of personalized experience often prerequisite for a steep increase in overall satisfaction.

PFEs increase metrics that are critical to overall experience

Take a look at the data below from a representative organization with which we partner at IMPACTS. The column on the left quantifies visitor perceptions of an organization based on specific evaluation metrics (e.g. admission value, education experience, entertainment experience, and employee courtesy), while the right side indicates the same values for visitors reporting at least one personal touch-point. Visitors who had similar experiences onsite – with the exception of a PFE – report very different perceptual outcomes. 

PFEs generally increase the perceived value of admission.

In other words, those who have a PFE believe that they got a better bang for their buck after paying admission to visit an organization.

 IMPACTS Admission PFE

PFEs also increase perceptions of entertainment experience, educational experience, and employee courtesy.

However, these metrics don’t all contribute to overall satisfaction equally. Here’s  the data on the breakdown.

 IMPACTS Entertainment PFE

Educational

IMAPCTS employee courtesy PFE

 

PFEs can be utilized to increase visitor satisfaction by daypart

If your organization is in the midst of a construction project or simply gets crowded during certain peak times of day, an organization may deploy PFEs as a mitigation strategy to minimize the impact of crowding perceptions on overall satisfaction.

 IMPACTS satisfaction by daypart PFE

Digital and “physical” touch work together to secure the financial futures of visitor serving organizations and keep folks coming in the door so that organizations may march steadily toward accomplishing their missions. I write about the increasingly critical importance of personalization on digital media for visitor-serving organizations, but we must remember that people online and people offline are still people – in fact, we want them to be the same person! Personalization – a trend that is getting a lot of buzz in the online space – is just as important onsite. Facebook and other social media sites are getting smarter about personalization –  ads are more intelligent, and millennials expect personalized experiences. Gone are the days of one-size-fits-all communications and “touch” points… online and offline.   Want to hear more about the data-supported relationship between digital and physical touch as they relate to satisfaction in visitor-serving organizations? Check out my WestMusings: Ten Minute Museum Talk or join me at MuseumNext in the UK where I’m thrilled to dive deeper in a keynote in June.  Interested in getting blog posts, tips, and some silly social media geekery periodically delivered in your Facebook newsfeed? Like my Facebook page (or ) Or for more regular sharing of nonprofit marketing information, follow me on Twitter *Photo credit: Harvard Museums of Science and Culture

Posted on by colleendilen in Community Engagement, Education, Exhibits, Management, Museums, Nonprofits, Words of Wisdom 5 Comments

About the author

colleendilen

MPA. Chief Market Engagement Officer at IMPACTS Research & Development. Nonprofit marketer, Generation Y museum, zoo & aquarium writer/speaker, web engagement geek, data nerd, marathoner, nomad, herbivore

5 Responses to Personalizing the Onsite Experience Increases Satisfaction in Visitor-Serving Organizations (DATA)

  1. Steve Massi

    Colleen,

    Does a PFE have to be a human to human interaction? Or can it be digital to human engagement based on some type of in-venue behavior, e.g. guest visits a particular exhibition, or buys a specific item, etc., and then receives some type of real-time reward or acknowledgment, either via human or digital communication?

     
    • colleendilen

      Good question, Steve. This data demonstrates findings related to PFEs defined as human interactions (one-to-one or one-to-few). It is certainly possible that digital experiences may positively impact metrics critical to overall satisfaction, but that would be a different finding. (Though it is a good idea for me to see if I may look into it for a future post! Please check back and thanks for the idea!)

       
      • Steve Massi

        Colleen, I’d be glad to discuss details with you if you want to explore that path!

  2. Rita Kemen

    Thank you for this article expanding upon PFEs!

     
    • colleendilen

      You are welcome, Rita. Thanks for reading and hope it was helpful! :-)

       

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