How Annual Timeframes Hurt Cultural Organizations

Some cultural executives still aim for short-term attendance spikes at the expense of long-term financial solvency – and they Read more

Special Exhibits vs. Permanent Collections (DATA)

Special exhibits don’t do what many cultural organizations think that they do. If fact, they often do the opposite. Read more

Eight Realities To Help You Become A Data-Informed Cultural Organization

Is your organization integrating market research into strategic decision-making processes yet? Here are eight important things to keep in Read more

A Quarter of Likely Visitors to Cultural Organizations Are In One Age Bracket (DATA)

Nearly 25% of potential attendees to visitor-serving organizations fall into one, ten-year age bracket. Which generation has the greatest Read more

People Trust Museums More Than Newspapers. Here Is Why That Matters Right Now (DATA)

Actually, it always matters. But data lend particular insight into an important role that audiences want museums to play Read more

The Top Seven Macro Trends Impacting Cultural Organizations

These seven macro trends are driving the market for visitor-serving organizations. Big data helps spot market trends. The data that Read more

videos

Five Videos That Will Make You Proud To Work With A Cultural Organization

Let’s pause and celebrate the hard and important work of working with cultural organizations.

Talk of defunding the National Endowment for the Arts seems to be making this winter season feel a bit gloomier. Moreover, the last several weeks of KYOB posts have revolved around important, data-heavy topics that can be challenging to wrap our minds around: Negative substitution of historic visitors to cultural organizations; low visitor confidence levels; the importance of checks and balances for cultural organizations; and data about the most dissatisfying aspect of a visit…pant, pant. It’s all critical information and – even though data can be tough to swallow sometimes – it’s only by being curious and acknowledging the realities of our sector that we are able to put on our thinking caps and charge forward with our important work of educating and inspiring audiences.

Speaking of feeling inspired…I think that this week calls for a break to reflect on the social good and hard work that folks working for and within cultural organizations do every single day. Our work – your work – is damn important.

(That’s the first time I’ve ever sworn on KYOB! I feel good about it.)

Like a true nerd, there are many things (aside from a long list of beloved cultural organizations) that make me giddily geeky and, if I’m honest, a bit emotional. This famous speech from Shakespeare’s Henry V, everything Paul Revere, this Carl Sandburg poem about Chicago, and Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin East are a few, very quick examples that I think my friends might call me out on immediately if they were in the room where I am writing. I know you’ve got yours, too! I’m talking about topics, spaces, and works of art that move you and make you glad to be alive.

I’ll get back to sharing new data next week. This week I want to share some of what makes me tick in hopes that it may help keep you ticking along, too – should you need a boost. With the recent Oscars on the brain and YouTube being about to overtake TV as America’s most-watched platform, here are five videos that I find myself coming back to over and over again as a person who works with cultural organizations. These little videos make me geeky, proud, and pleased to be doing the work that I do. I hope that you, cultural organization-loving folks, may feel the same way.

There are many excellent videos by, for, and about cultural organizations. There are many great cultural organization scenes in films – like this famous scene from Ferris Bueller’s Day Off. There are also many great cultural organization, association, society, and alliance videos – like Indiana Historical Society’s hilarious Hot Pepper History. (Am I a horrible person that I think that video is laugh-out-loud funny?) There are also many great videos outside of the sector providing thought fuel about cultural organizations – like this video on what art museums are for by School of Life. And, hey, I cannot leave out my own Know Your Own Bone Fast Fact videos! I could be linking to videos from different sources for a long, long, long time. But I won’t. Instead, I’ve narrowed this list down to only five – and it was hard! I aimed for variety…and I also aimed for videos that are truly worth a watch. (I also decided to stay away from any client created videos to keep things fair.)  These are videos to sit down in front of with a cup of tea (or a glass of wine) and enjoy while, hopefully, patting yourself of the back for your hard work in making the world a better place. Let’s interrupt the regularly-scheduled data dump to share resources to inspire one another this week, shall we?

 

1) People Will Come. Field of Dreams (1989)

This one’s for those of you who genuinely love the content that your cultural organization shares with the world. You don’t need to like baseball or to have seen this (excellent) film to get goosebumps watching this scene. There’s a feeling in this clip – a yearning to share something so meaningful and yet struggling with the practical means to share it and just knowing that it will change people – that’s easy to relate to if you work for a cultural organization.

 

2) Spark. Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance (2009)

Many organizations, associations, and alliances create videos today and many of them are inspiring. Some videos simply stand out – and this one does to me. This video by the Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance shares clips of people talking about their “spark” moments at cultural organizations in Philadelphia. It moves me, because I’ve been sparked and I get it. I totally get it. I’ll bet that if you’re a cultural organization lover, you get it, too. Perhaps this video is so powerful because it highlights what other people say about cultural organizations instead of what cultural organizations say about themselves. (Here’s the data on why that’s important.) Either way, this hits a nerve that makes me watch it while nodding as the video goes on and thinking, “Yes, yes! Cultural organizations are awesome!”

 

3) To Quote Whitman. Dead Poets Society (1989)

Stick with me for a moment here, because I’m going deep. I’ve recently been working on a project with IMPACTS colleagues called “The Remarkable Project.” It’s being led by Jim Hekkers, the former managing director of the Monterey Bay Aquarium, and our team has spanned the globe visiting numerous organizations in the quest to uncover what makes a visitor-serving organization “remarkable.” The project has involved a great deal of data, but also has explored the trickier, “softer” things that make an experience remarkable (including that elusive feeling of inspiration). For me, the thing that ties together every remarkable experience that I’ve had at a visitor-serving organization (or anywhere else) summons the same feeling: The excitement and awe and wonder of being alive. For you, it may be something completely different that comes close to communicating a remarkable experience at a cultural organization. For me, it’s something like Walt Whitman’s Oh Me! Oh Life!

 

4) Art History. John Costello (2013)

It’s time for the more “underground” – but every bit as relevant – video contribution to the list. Interestingly enough, my uncle made this video to promote enrollment in an AP Art History Course that he teaches in Colorado. The video is simple, and I think that’s why it moves me. It’s simply a series of famous artworks with written questions. Of course, this is a video highlighting works of art, but I think the “so what?” that it touches upon works for all types of mission-driven, visitor-serving organizations. Each type tells important stories and gets to the bottom of key questions that connect us to one another, to our communities, and to the world at large. I often re-watch this video. Like art itself, it resonates with me as forever timely.

 

5) #DayOfFacts. The Field Museum (2017)

I spy a museum proudly executing its mission with integrity. Over 280 scientific and cultural organizations celebrated #DayofFacts on February 17. A lot of great things came of that day: organizations standing up for their missions, protecting facts, inspiring audiences…and this video by The Field Museum. It just makes me so dang proud to work with mission-driven, visitor-serving organizations. Data suggest that organizations walking their talk matters. I’m goosebump-filled by 0:06 of this video, choked up at 0:42, and…sheesh…I’m not teary at 0:52, you’re teary at 0:52. “Facts are welcome here. And so are you.”

 

Thanks for watching and allowing me to share this little list with you. If you still have some bandwidth and more tea (or wine) in that cup of yours, head on over to my YouTube channel and check out some fast fasts for cultural executives. Now that I hopefully have you feeling a little bit mushy, I figure some data-talk might balance things back out a bit! On that note, I have new data coming to you next week and we’ll hop back into our regularly-scheduled analysis.

If there’s a video that inspires you and keeps you going as a cultural-organization lover, I’d like to see it! Please link to it in the comments so that others can enjoy it as well. I’ll end this post with another classic to help us all rise to the occasion during the final, dreary days of winter: “I’m made of wax, Larry. What are you made out of?”

 

Like this post? Don’t forget to check out my Fast Fact videos on my YouTube channel. Here are a few related posts from Know Your Own Bone that you might also enjoy:

 

Interested in getting blog posts, tips, and some silly social media geekery periodically delivered in your Facebook newsfeed? Like my Facebook page. Or for more regular sharing of nonprofit marketing information, follow me on Twitter.

 

Posted on by Colleen Dilenschneider in Community Engagement, Miscellaneous 4 Comments

Millennial Data Round Up: What Your Cultural Organization Needs To Know

The great millennial round up 2016 - Know Your Own Bone

This is what you need to know in one, single post.

Millennials are a hot topic. While I consider “millennials” but one topic in the file of “pressing issues necessitating the evolution of visitor-serving organizations,” it turns out that there is a lot of information to point out and underscore.  No doubt, I’ll be adding to this list with future posts and there’s more where these came from, but these nine Know Your Own Bone Posts make up a helpful set list for engaging this new and important audience. I’ve been on a millennial-related post roll recently. Let’s keep it going for one more week.  Here is a compilation of nine data-informed take-aways for cultural centers aiming to reach millennial audiences.

Some of these posts are videos and some are data-informed articles. Each of these points links to a post with more in-depth information. But before we dive in, I must share this (though it is mentioned in several posts): “Millennial talk” is increasingly code for “everybody talk.” The trends that are most effective in engaging this generation are trends that are increasingly required for reaching other generations as well. So if you’re not completely sick of “millennial talk” and are able to take a step back, you may find yourself nodding and thinking, “Hey! This is increasingly true for ALL visitors to cultural organizations.” Because it is.

 

1) MILLENNIAL TALK is not about ignoring other generations

This is the best place to start. If you’re experiencing “millennial talk” overload, here are four important things to keep in mind. Remember: When we talk about the need to reach millennials, we are NOT talking about ignoring other generations. Instead, we are adding a new, important generation to our discussion list of existing important generations. In order to carry out effective “millennial talk,” we need to remove defensiveness and realize that we’re talking about the future of cultural organizations for all visitors and generations – not only millennials.

 

2) We have a big problem with engaging millennials (DATA)

Why Cultural Organizations Must Better Engage Millennials (Know Your Own Bone)

And we need to fix this in order to survive long-term. Data suggest that the issue is particularly pressing. Millennials currently represent the largest segment of visitors to cultural organizations. (Nope. Not Baby Boomers). However, millennials are also the only age demographic not visiting cultural organizations at representative rates. This means that millennials are both our most frequent current visitors AND the visitors that we need to do a better job attracting in order to survive and thrive. As sick as we all may be of talking about millennials (I am, too, and I’m a millennial!), these facts make effectively engaging this audience a VERY big deal. This is a reality that organizations ignore at their own risk and it is my experience that showing this data and underscoring  this situation helps explain why this generation is getting so much attention right now.

 

3) There are two (most important!) things to keep in mind for engaging millennials

 

Okay – so reaching millennials is important and other generations should not take this need to mean that their own generations are less important. So how can organizations best reach millennials? There are a lot of tips and tricks out there, but I’ve boiled it all down to two. Here are the two, most important mindset shifts for engaging millennials. They sound simple, but they are actually large-scale culture changes for many visitor-serving organizations to carry out. They require a shift in how we think. Again, however, making these shifts does not only help position organizations to better reach millennials. It positions organizations to better reach all visitors in today’s connected world. Really, these two shifts are necessary for engaging nearly everyone. 

 

4) Millennial audiences may be our best audiences (DATA)

Engaging millennials has a huge payoff! This post highlights three, data-informed reasons why it’s absolutely worth the energy to reach these folks. Namely, they are super-connected to many people and have terrific potential to share positive experiences and spread valuable word of mouth and third-party endorsements of your organization. They are also most likely to share those positive experiences with their circles! Moreover, millennials have the greatest intent to revisit a cultural organization among the three, primary generations today. It all adds up to an understanding that targeting millennials is a good thing for everybody – and this generation does a lot of important messaging for organizations!

 

5) Millennials spend the most on food and retail (DATA)

It’s a smaller point, but it’s also an added bonus: Millennials spend more than any other generation on food and retail at visitor-serving organizations. Check out the data. For those folks who are less “believing” of the incredible value of third party endorsements in securing visitation and the importance of millennial audiences on that front (discussed above), here’s a more cut-and-dry financial incentive. Are we all happy now? Yes? Excellent.

 

6) Attracting millennials is key to engaging people of different racial and ethnic backgrounds (DATA)

Attracting Diverse Visitors to Cultural Organizations- Know Your Own Bone

Organizations often aim to engage folks of different racial and ethnic backgrounds. In doing this, many organizations overlook information regarding how people of different racial and ethnic backgrounds actually view themselves. The United States population is growing increasingly diverse with folks that are different than the historic visitor to cultural organizations – and much of that change is driven by millennials. We are the most diverse generation in the workforce. But we don’t primarily identify ourselves as our ethnic backgrounds. We identify ourselves as being young. This data is critical because it means that an important key to engaging audiences of more diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds is – in fact – engaging millennials.

 

7) Millennials are changing membership programs (DATA)

Millennials are necessitating change. If your organization doesn’t have as many millennial members as it should, it may be because your organization is not yet offering the type of membership that millennials want! (In fact, many aren’t.) The data about what millennials want in a membership program is particularly cool (in my humble opinion) because it underscores a trend that we are seeing for members on the whole. Mission-based members are more valuable members than transaction-based members and, really, what many organizations consider to be one “membership program” may actually be two, separate programs. There’s important thought-fuel here.

 

8) Millennials are not naturally caring more about arts and culture as they age (DATA)

millennial cause durability

And now for some not-great news: We cannot sit around and wait for millennials to “grow into” caring about cultural organizations. It’s not happening. At IMPACTS, we call this “cause durability” and millennials have it. The thought that millennials will “age into” historic visitor profiles is not proving true. Simply because the historic visitor profile is an older, white person doesn’t mean that millennials will have the same values when they become older, white people themselves (…particularly because this generation is incredibly diverse so that’s not even a thing for almost half of our generation). “But,” you say, “this isn’t about ethnicity – it’s about growing wisdom and appreciating the finer things in life as one ages!” Okay. We can hope for that, but data isn’t supporting it and is it worth the risk to your organization’s future to simply sit around without effectively engaging these audiences?

 

9) It is time to add millennials to your board of directors

Millennials represent the largest generation in human history. Still, many boards of directors for cultural organizations do not include a single millennial. Here are five important reasons to add millennials to your board of directors. They aren’t rocket science. They may simply be inconvenient truths… but truths they are, nonetheless. It’s difficult to attract millennials without listening to them and getting their input where it counts: in the board room and in leadership meetings.

 

There’s more to come on Know Your Own Bone in regard to engaging millennials, to be sure – and there are more posts than these in my archives. That said, I’ve tried to select the hardest-hitting, what-you-need-to-know round up. We’ll take a break from millennials for a while and get back to other myth-busts and trends in the weeks ahead- but there’s a lot here and it’s important. I hope that these posts are useful to you and please remember to dive into the individual points to get the full information and dig into the data. We’re on our way to integrating new mindsets into our organizations!

 

Like this post? Don’t forget to check out my Fast Fact videos on my YouTube channel. Interested in getting blog posts, tips, and some silly social media geekery periodically delivered in your Facebook newsfeed? Like my Facebook page. Or for more regular sharing of nonprofit marketing information, follow me on Twitter.

 

Posted on by Colleen Dilenschneider in Community Engagement, Fast Facts Video, Financial Solvency, IMPACTS Data, Millennials, Nonprofit Marketing, Sector Evolution, Trends Comments Off on Millennial Data Round Up: What Your Cultural Organization Needs To Know

One Year of Fast Facts: Here Are Your Favorite Videos for Cultural Executives

The amazing Guy Bauer Productions team surprised me with this little video because I am a ridiculous human. I could not ask for better partners in making these videos!

Loyal KYOB readers will remember that last year, posts were published every other Wednesday as opposed to every week. But the tribe of KYOB readers was steadily growing – and I was getting more and more messages, emails, and opportunities to aid organizations with nonproprietary data and associated analysis. Something needed to change. I needed to post more frequently, of course, but my inability to make it to many conferences (dang, day job!) left me wishing for a better way to make the data shareable and accessible to cultural executives. Enter: Incredible support from the IMPACTS team and the amazing talent of Guy Bauer Productions.

The very first Know Your Own Bone Fast Facts video was posted one year ago (Admission Pricing is a Science – Not an Art), and my YouTube channel was born as a means to embed videos on this website. So far, I’ve posted 27 videos and I’ve received feedback that they’ve been shared in conferences, all-staff meetings, and board rooms. What a rush! I hope that these videos have been helpful to you in sharing fast facts with friends and colleagues and I hope that they – like other KYOB posts – have ignited passionate conversation within your institutions. (What other kind could I hope for?!)


KYOB fast facts image Some fun facts:
I’m wearing TOMS in all of the videos. (Comfort first, amiright?) Nika Vaughn Makeup Artists (earlier videos) and Makeup By Jaycie (more recent videos – and the lovely lady in the photos above) make me appear as if I kind of have my act together in the looks department (it’s a ruse). The Guy Bauer Productions team not only produces incredible videos with engaging graphics, but they are amazing partners. Shoot days are delightful celebrations of Potbelly sandwiches, donuts, drinking my weight in water, laughing with the team, “one more run-throughs,” and trying not to mispronounce “organizations” for the millionth time.

To celebrate a full year of KYOB Fast Fact videos, I would like to share your most shared and viewed of the bunch. These are the most shared and viewed on Know Your Own Bone, as a very vast majority of viewership takes place here on KYOB as opposed to YouTube.

 

Let us kick off this countdown!

 

10) Local Audiences Have Skewed Perceptions of Cultural Organizations (DATA) 

Regardless of region or cultural organization type, local audiences are the hardest to please.

 

9) How Much Money Should Your Cultural Organization Invest in Getting People in the Door? (DATA) 

Here’s how much money museums and cultural organizations should be spending to get people in the door – according to data.

 

8) Data Reveals the Best Thing About a Visit to a Cultural Organization (DATA)

Hint: It’s not seeing exhibits or performances. (That is a distant second.)

 

7) The Five Best Reasons to Add Millennials to Your Nonprofit Board of Directors 

Don’t have any millennials on your nonprofit board yet? Your future might be tough.

 

6) Know Yourself: The Often Forgotten Key to a Successful Social Media Strategy

Don’t even think about creating a social media strategy without having your brand vetted by leadership first.

 

5) Which Is More Important For Cultural Organizations: Being Educational or Being Entertaining? (DATA)

From a visitor’s perspective, which is more important for cultural organizations: Being entertaining or being educational? Here’s what the data says.

 

4) Nonprofit Recognition: What Matters More To Visitors Than Your Tax Status (DATA)

Do visitors know that museums  and other cultural organizations are nonprofits? Data says: Nope. Here’s what really matters to audiences about your organization.

 

3) Why Discounting Hurts Your Cultural Organization And What To Do Instead (DATA)

Discounts don’t do what organizations think that they do…

 

2) Five Data-Informed Fast Facts About Visitors To Cultural Organizations (DATA)

Visitors to cultural organizations often have certain telltale behaviors.  Just for fun, here are five of them.

 

1) The Membership Benefits That Millennials Want From Cultural Organizations (DATA)

Don’t have many millennial members? Maybe you aren’t offering a membership program that millennials actually want.

 

Thank you to all of my great KYOB readers for your support and for sharing these videos! I plan to continue making these videos for as long as they are helpful to all of you. As usual, I welcome all and any feedback! Please leave any feedback or requests in the comments! Cheers to another year of sub-three-minute (most of the time) fast fact videos!

 

Like this post? Don’t forget to check out my Fast Fact videos on my YouTube channel. Here are a few more Know Your Own Bone Fast Fact posts that didn’t make the top-ten cut, but are among my favorites:

 

Interested in getting blog posts, tips, and some silly social media geekery periodically delivered in your Facebook newsfeed? Like my Facebook page. Or for more regular sharing of nonprofit marketing information, follow me on Twitter.

Posted on by Colleen Dilenschneider in Community Engagement, Fast Facts Video, Nonprofit Marketing 2 Comments